Psychopathy marker — “Neurodevelopmental marker for limbic maldevelopment in antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy”

braindifferences

“Illustration of normal septum pellucidum (thin membrane separating the lateral ventricles) in a non-antisocial control (a) and the cavum septum pellucidum in an individual with antisocial personality disorder (b).

Coronal magnetic resonance image slices are at the level of the head of the anterior limb of the internal capsule, caudate, putamen, accumbens, and insula. Highlighted within the bue box is the septum pellucidum, dividing the lateral ventricles and bordered superiorly by the body of the corpus callosum and inferiorly by the fornix. The normal control (a) shows a fused septum pellucidum, whereas the participant with antisocial personality disorder (b) shows a fluid-filled cavum inside the two leaflets of the septum pellucidum.”

http://bjp.rcpsych.org/content/197/3/186/F1.expansion

Search: my sociopathic husband is trying to have me committed

You’ve got to go on the offensive.  In the United State, the truth is its own defense.  Label him a sociopath.  Demand he submit to a court ordered brain scan (plus a DNA sample).

Perhaps the most useful test would be for the incomplete brain wall, the cavum septum pellucidum (I’m thinking out loud here, not offering this as expert opinion).  We need to find out which test is the best for courtrooms, one that would give a yes/no answer and that would be easily visible to an informed layman in side by side scans.  Anybody know?  Adrian Raine’s tests are mentioned in these posts, https://pathwhisperer.wordpress.com/2011/11/29/criminal-minds-will-testing-the-brain-even-before-birth-separate-the-good-seeds-from-the-bad/, https://pathwhisperer.wordpress.com/2011/09/20/post-redux-are-saps-socially-adept-psychopaths-real/.  More, Abnormal Brain Region Characterizes Those With Psychopathy, Habitual Liar Brains Look Different On Scans, and www.futurepundit.com/archives/001998.html.  Other tests also, https://pathwhisperer.wordpress.com/?s=brain+scan.

Good luck.

UPDATEhttps://pathwhisperer.wordpress.com/2014/12/07/neurodevelopmental-marker-for-limbic-maldevelopment-in-antisocial-personality-disorder-and-psychopathy/

“Criminal Minds — Will testing the brain, even before birth, separate the good seeds from the bad?”

More Adrian Raine.

. . . a series of studies using magnetic resonance imaging, which reveals structures and shapes, showed that criminals and people who scored high on tests of antisocial disorders had a smaller than normal orbitofrontal region and amygdala. And the corpus callosum, the communications bridge between the brain’s two hemispheres, was abnormally large.

. . . [Adrian Raine] needed to go back even further and look for a defect that begins before birth and can still be detected in adults. Raine found it in a hole in the head. More precisely, a thin wall of brain tissue that separates a hole—all brains have these spaces—into two. The hole appears during the 12th week of a fetus’s development, and the wall—pushed forward by a normally developing amygdala and other brain areas—divides it by the 20th week. When the wall doesn’t form completely, a condition known by the jawbreaking name of cavum septum pellucidum, it’s usually a sign of abnormal development in the amygdala and other structures. Years later, in adults, the failed wall can be spotted in a brain scan.

In a 2010 paper, Raine and his colleagues compared people with and without the feature on several fronts. The groups were tested for antisocial personality disorder, psychopathy, and aggression. Their records were searched for criminal arrests and convictions. In every single one of those areas, there were a lot more men and women with the wall defect. Here, finally, was evidence tracing criminality back to the womb, before any head-banging could occur.

“I think there’s no longer any question, scientifically, that there’s an association between the brain and criminal behavior. We’re beyond the point of debating that,” says Raine. “Every study can be criticized on methodology. But when you look at the whole, at all the different designs, it’s just hard to deny there is something going on with biology.”