Search: “should sociopaths be placed in group therapy”

Absolutely not.  Since they can’t be cured or psychologically changed, group therapy only teaches them how to pass more successfully.  It teaches them to become even more skillful wolves among the sheep.

Further, any therapist who believes they should is not actually a therapist at all, and should, in my opinion, lose their license.  Therapy only works through the therapist witnessing for the client’s unconscious (or soul or psyche) the client’s soul wounds.  The client may divulge to the therapist soul truths they can’t divulge to themselves, as the client journeys to reintegrate the alienated self.  Basically this is the Alice Miller methodology.  But it was ever thus, she is just one of the few to try to write it down.  The only therapists who are useful are the ones who’s subconscious can sense the needs of their clients’ subconscious and mirror them.  If the soul defect of the sociopath/psychopath is not apparent to the therapist, that person is a therapist in name only.

Being psychopaths, the normal psychopathic shenanigans will take place in the group.  Extremely manipulative the psychopath may essentially take over the group process without the enabling therapist’s even being aware of what is happening.  Or the psychopath may be driven by arrogance to prove his superiority over and over again.  There’s a well-known story of a psychopathic client bragging to the group of seducing both the therapist’s wife and girlfriend, all the while with the therapist sitting there attempting to keep his best therapist face on.  To put it bluntly, any therapist who allows a psychopath in group therapy with non-psychopaths is stupid and/or incompetent.

For the record (private message transmitted publicly)

This is not an informational post.  I wish to cover certain events publicly for the record.

In this blog I have occasionally discussed a therapist who I consider to be mentally ill, to be a rigid narcissist (one of Scott Peck’s mentally ill evil of his book ‘People of the Lie’).  I had an old friend who had four sessions a week with this therapist (let’s call her Nancy) (Nancy Becker, LCSW, http://nancybeckertherapy.com/, https://therapists.psychologytoday.com/rms/name/Nancy_Becker_LCSW_New+York_New+York_145736) including group therapy.  Any group therapy run by a therapist with a denied personality defect will become something of a cult in celebration of that defect.  This defect also lead her to admit psychopaths to the group.  “Treating” psychopaths in group therapy with non-psychopaths is like throwing a piranha into a goldfish bowl.  For this I believe she should lose her license and her normal clients should consider suing her for malpractice.  Furthermore this therapist came from a therapy cult background, the Sullivanian Fourth Wall theater as I recall.

Anyway the practice is in my neighborhood.  In the normal course of a week I will walk by their building 3-4 times (it’s on Broadway).  I  never interact with them in any way.  I haven’t seen my old friend (an ex) in many years.  However there seems to be something terribly wrong now.

A couple days ago I ran into a senior associate of this therapy group in a grocery store, actually her husband, let’s call him Steve (Steven Cope, LCSW, http://www.stevencope.com/, http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/steven-cope-lcsw-new-york), who is a therapist himself.  He seemed considerably agitated, even fearful, at this meeting, which is bizarre.  I have also noticed that the group’s “circle” has been reacting to me bizarrely.  Perhaps it springs from an event of some months ago.

On that occasion, I was walking some twenty blocks downtown to do some shopping.  I absently noticed that I ran into a particular individual 3 or 4 times on the trip downtown.  When on the trip back uptown I kept running into him again, I realized he was following me.  If I looked at him he would suddenly turn to a crosswalk or go into a store.  But then he’d be back again.  I also realized that he had a confederate shadowing us on the other side of the street.

There was nothing professional about them.  The one near me had sort of a long nose, pointy face, strange eyes and an extreme arrogance of attitude.  I considered him to be an immediately obvious psychopath.  The other seemed like a normal young guy, brown haired, with a beard (I think).

When we were back uptown within a block or so of the therapist’s location I stopped and confronted him silently.  They disappeared when I took out a camera phone.  At that point I then took a picture of a car nearby that I knew was affiliated with the group in case the car had been used by them to jumpfrog my position during my shopping expedition.  I had previously seen the car parked on my block on days I had scheduled comings and goings, going by slowly when I ate at outdoor cafes, shadowing me at walking pace a block, block and a half back as I walked, etc.

The above is the whole event (though I did run into the psychopath in a totally different part of town that I regularly visit a week or so later).  Afterwards, I also began noticing that their “circle” in their immediate neighborhood responded to my presence completely out of proportion.

So my conclusion is that these two were therapy group members of this therapist.  I don’t know what the psychopath had to say to others, but it is a cause for worry.  I wish to turn down the volume, there is absolutely nothing going on here, absolutely no reason for anyone to be fearful of me.  The above account is the sum total, but psychopaths will tell any lie they can get away with and I don’t know what these two claimed.  I’m totally guessing, I just don’t know.  I have no idea why Steve was agitated at my presence.

Also angry psychotic level narcissists can be extremely dangerous.  I don’t want any further developments.

One of the reasons I took up writing this blog was to hold up a big ‘BACK OFF’ sign to petty psychopathic harassment.  It doesn’t seem to be working.

Search: pseudologia fantastica treatment

There isn’t any.  Pseudologues (i.e., sociopaths who are also pathological liars) are the way they are born to be.  Neither freewill or individual psychology plays any role.  Their brains are even different (www.futurepundit.com/archives/001998.html, www.futurepundit.com/archives/003035.html.

However, there are other types of psychological liars so each individual should obviously be evaluated.  A problem with this, though, is that those individuals we would assume to be experts, therapists, probably have less experience with pseudologues and sociopaths than we do in daily life.  Pseudologues and sociopaths, being perfect in every way, simply do not often present themselves for treatment.  Further, if they do, their purpose is not to change but to learn how to pass for normal more easily — in effect they seek to use talk therapy to become more adept as sociopathic predators.

I agree with those that believe pseudologues and sociopaths should never, ever be accepted into talk therapy.  I would go even further to state that any therapists who do in fact do this should lose their licenses — since it is only by their being out of touch with their own soul that they could fail to recognize the soulless, could fail to recognize that they couldn’t reach the sociopathic client.  Any therapist out of touch with their own soul can not be of any use to anybody, is by definition not even a therapist in the first place.

The worst situation I have ever known of in this regard involved a therapy group that allowed sociopathic members along with the depressives, neurotics, incest victims, etc.  I’m sure the therapist (Nancy Becker, LCSW, http://nancybeckertherapy.com/, https://therapists.psychologytoday.com/rms/name/Nancy_Becker_LCSW_New+York_New+York_145736) would never have thrown piranhas into a goldfish bowl, but this she found acceptable.  I’m not a fan of group therapy in the first place (I believe it is a grotesque lowering of boundaries before strangers one can not know) but accepting sociopaths into group therapy should be grounds for automatic malpractice suits against a therapist.

A universal among sociopaths (including pseudologues) is delight at manipulating the non-sociopathic into behavior betraying their souls.

In the instance above I consider the therapist to be a rigid or malignant narcissist herself (one of Scott Peck’s mentally ill evil described in his book, People of the Lie).  Many people object to the concepts of evil and mental illness being joined, I can only assume they have never dealt with any malignant narcissists.   Group therapy with such a flawed therapist would become a celebration of her defect.  Sociopaths would effortlessly join that effort.  In addition narcissists are very attracted to sociopaths, narcissists themselves have to spend eternity fighting their souls, their consciences, their dreams and do in fact wake up to their true humanity occasionally.  Sociopaths have none of these problems.

A small grotesquery in an extremely grotesque story is that this therapist was called Mother by her clients.  It is hard to imagine a greater perversion of reality or semantics.

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